A few places less appealing for baby boomers

Over the years at BoomerCafé, we’ve shown you good places to retire and good places to just feel young. But this time, thanks to our friends at Grandparents.com, we’re taking you in the other direction, because they rounded up a few cities with some unique characteristics that they say might make a baby boomer like you feel older than you really are.

Cost of living, number of sunny days or proximity to leisure activities are all important to consider when researching where to retire. But other, less obvious factors may make the difference between feeling young and active — and feeling old and out of touch.

Provo, Utah

Provo, Utah

Provo, Utah
Home to Brigham-Young University, Provo is also home to the youngest population in the country. The average median age for Provo residents is 23.4, which means its residents are 14 years younger than the average American. Surrounding yourself with young, vibrant college students might be one way to stay young, but watching those bouncing coeds frolic along the campus can also do the reverse: serve as a reminder for how long ago you were doing the same thing.

Madison, Wisconsin
Listening to your own grandchildren screeching on the playground (with joy, of course) is onething. Being surrounded by other people’s screaming kids is quite another. With the most playgrounds per resident -– seven per every 10,000 residents-– in the nation, moving to Madison might need to come with a set of earplugs.

Chula Vista, California.

Chula Vista, California.

Chula Vista, California
Trying new things you never got a chance to try is part of what makes retirement so grand. Ifchomping on a mouth guard, strapping on a helmet, and flying through the air on a flimsy, wheeled board doesn’t sound like your cup of tea, then Chula Vista may not be for you. With the most skateboard parks per 100,000 residents, this board-acious city is a skating aficionado’s concrete paradise.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana.

Baton Rouge, Louisiana
For some people, few things in this world can make them feel older than a senior center. So if you’re someone who cringes at the thought of being surrounded by the muted tones of a retirement facility, then Baton Rouge might not be your best bet. With the most recreational and senior centers per 20,000 residents, don’t be surprised if you wake up one morning with a purple perm and reservations for the Early Bird Special.

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo, New York

Buffalo, New York
Sometimes all it takes to feel your age is a heavy rainstorm— and the accompanying achy joints. If you live in Buffalo, you might feel your age (and then some!) almost every day. With more than 130 rainy days per year, Buffalo has the most rainy days in the country.

Milwaukee, Wisconsin and Worcester, Massachusetts
Being single and ready to mingle in your golden years can be just as (if not more) exciting as dating in your 20s and 30s. That is, if the eligible singles aren’t more than two decades younger than you. As the top cities for women seeking men age 35 and under, and men seeking women age 35 and under, Milwaukee and Worcester,respectively, might not top your retirement list if diving back into the dating pool is part of the grand plan.

Syracuse, New York.

Syracuse, New York.

Syracuse, New York
If just thinking about snow makes your back hurt, then Syracuse may not be for you. As the city with the highest average snowfall per year-– 126.3 inches-– Syracuse and its citizens have their snow-shoveling cut out for them.

Flint, Michigan.

Flint, Michigan.

Flint, Michigan
While there are many cities that are still suffering from the economic downturn, the city of Flint has the highest rate of urban blight in the country, according to theGreater New Orleans Data Center. If we truly are a product of our environment-– as businessman and philanthropist W. Clement Stone once said-– then surrounding ourselves with dilapidated buildings and homes is enough to make anyone feel old and rundown.

2 Comments

  1. Ah, well, I hope the tongue was firmly in cheek on this one. Each of these characteristics, by themselves, might disqualify a place as a good one for a boomer, but overall, Baton Rouge or Provo or Chula Vista might have some other wonderful characteristics. Like lower cost of living, or plenty of first class medical facilities, or grandkids nearby (you can never underestimate that one.) This is a lot like reading those Money Magazine issues “The Best Place to Retire” which my husband and I do – only to come away with . . . well, there’s no perfect place, ever. You pick and choose from the most important things and then cross your fingers and hope for the best. I mean, Syracuse or Madison might have great cultural activities and lots of safe public transportation which mitigates the other negatives – although I have to agree that Flint, Michigan (and many other cities in Michigan) are probably not that great anymore – but they are inexpensive!

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