The classic Ford Mustang is put out to pasture by Ford

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At a time when many companies are trying to figure out how to tap into the enormous baby boomer demographic – 76-million strong – Ford Motor Company is planning to abandon production of a car that became an icon of the boomer generation, the Mustang. Ford wants to reach a younger, more impressionable audience.

Classic 1966 Mustang.

The Mustang, the so-called pony car that launched affordable and compact sports cars, today strongly hews to the look of the 1964 original. But Ford is working on radical makeover of its signature youth-market car, people familiar with Ford’s plans said. The next generation would retain the shark-nosed grille and round headlights, but would look more like the new Ford Fusion than the current Mustang, according to Ford sources.

The change is part of a bid to make the Mustang appeal to Generation Y, the roughly 80 million people who were born between 1980 and 1999, reports the Wall Street Journal.

Mick got it right when he sang, “We don’t get no satisfaction … ”

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5 Comments

  1. The Mustang is and always was a sexy, fun car. Seems to me that it would be the least of Ford’s worries when trying to appeal to young people. I had a ’94 that I junked last year, and though its innards were worn out, it still looked good!

  2. It never fails that when you have a good thing the bean counters screw with it. Look at how Dodge brought back the Charger and the Challenger.

  3. Paul,

    Amen to what you say! There have been so many hugely popular – even legendary – car models, and the auto makers always screw up subsequent “new and improved” models. I cannot think of one exception.

    Remember the retro-looking 1960 Volvo 544?! Heck, I suppose it wasn’t retro-looking … it WAS retro. But so cool with its sloped back.

    Thanks for the comment.

    David

    1. I had a 544. It was the only car I ever owned that sold fr=or more than I paid for it. The first person to come look at it bought it without haggling over the price. Damn!

      Yes, it was reliable, economical, and fun to drive. I’d buy another one today.

      1. A Volvo 544? I had one, too. My mother bought it in 1960 because American cars were so crappy then. She then passed it along to me. What a terrific car!

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